75 years after the Hiroshima bomb, a couple’s art still devastates

"Rescue" by Toshiko and Iri Maruki, part of an art series documenting the horror of the atomic bomb, at Maruki Gallery for the Hiroshima Panels in Higashimatsuyama, Japan. <span class="copyright">(Ann Summa)</span>
“Rescue” by Toshiko and Iri Maruki, part of an art series documenting the horror of the atomic bomb, at Maruki Gallery for the Hiroshima Panels in Higashimatsuyama, Japan. (Ann Summa)

Pika. It means glitter or flash in Japanese. It’s what survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima remember from exactly 75 years ago. The flash that popped in a blue cloudless morning sky. Followed immediately by a brilliant blue-white light that was far stronger and erased all shadows.

Survivors say they heard no sound.

Then the city of Hiroshima — homes, barracks, hospitals, factories, government offices, rice paddies, schools, street cars — simply vanished, along with Japanese soldiers, American prisoners of war, farmers, grandparents, schoolchildren.

An estimated 140,000 died. The shockwave leveled a two-mile radius and threw people into the air, bodies raining down in trees and bamboo thickets. Survivors in the rubble found themselves naked, their clothes blown away

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The 7 biggest snubs of the 2020 VMAs nominations

Normani, Harry Styles, and Halsey released some of the best music videos in recent memory.
Normani, Harry Styles, and Halsey released some of the best music videos in recent memory.

Normani/Harry Styles/Halsey/YouTube

  • The 2020 MTV Video Music Awards nominations were announced Thursday.

  • Harry Styles, Halsey, Selena Gomez, Dua Lipa, and BTS were all snubbed in major categories, despite releasing some of the past year’s biggest albums and best videos.

  • Artists like Normani and Miley Cyrus also delivered extraordinary visuals, yet still only received technical nominations.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Nominations for the 2020 MTV Video Music Awards were announced Thursday afternoon.

Ariana Grande and Lady Gaga led the pack with nine nods apiece, largely thanks to their smash collaboration “Rain On Me,” while Billie Eilish and The Weeknd followed with six each. 

However, other beloved artists with headline-making visuals were snubbed in major categories.

Keep reading to see Insider’s picks for the 7 biggest snubs, in no particular order.

Dua Lipa

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“Black Is King” continues Beyonce’s immortalizing of the Black American experience through art

Beyonce in "Black Is King"
Beyonce in “Black Is King”

Beyonce in “Black Is King” Travis Matthews/Disney+

There are times when a person doesn’t realize how drained, hot and thirsty she is until she sees water. “Black Is King” triggers that realization in its opening with a wide shot of a river, its gentle current carrying a basket. The biblical allusion to the story of Moses is plain to see, only in this context the untethered basket is a visual metaphor for a people . . . but also, for escape.

Filming for “Black Is King,” Beyoncé Knowles-Carter’s visual album accompaniment to her 2019 release “The Lion King: The Gift,” took place in the second half of last year after the film’s release but before the culture at large erupted with protests in the name of Black Lives Matter.

It arrives at a time of unfortunate inevitability for any social justice movement, when

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Tokyo show tests if fans will come

It’s a blockbuster exhibition, featuring some of the biggest names in Japan’s contemporary art scene. But will people flock to galleries in the midst of the global coronavirus pandemic?

That’s the question on the mind of Mami Kataoka, director of the influential Mori Art Museum, which reopens on Friday after a five-month hiatus with one of its most high-profile Japanese art shows in years.

“We live in a time when we are asked, ‘What is the role of museums and what is the role of art?'” Kataoka told AFP at a press preview of the “STARS” exhibit this week.

The exhibition was supposed to open in April, running through the summer to attract visitors in town for the Olympics, with works by leading Japanese art figures like Yayoi Kusama and Takashi Murakami.

But the coronavirus has forced a year-long delay of the Games, and the museum closed its doors in

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