Dorsey Rohweder

Skye McAlpine on the Art of Simple, Sophisticated Entertaining You Can Do Any Day of the Week

Photo credit: Bloomsbury Press
Photo credit: Bloomsbury Press

From Veranda

For recipe developer, columnist, and hostess extraordinaire Skye McAlpine, home isn’t so much a distinct place as a feeling, and one that is strongest when she gathers the people she loves most around a table with a brilliantly understated meal. As someone who splits her time between London and Venice, she finds entertaining to be the best way to settle back into either home and make it feel like hers again, though she hesitates to use that specific word to describe it.

“Entertaining is short-hand for having friends over,” McAlpine says. “I just don’t like the word because it has all these connotations and pretentions and obligations, like you need to put on a show for your friends when you just want to enjoy being in their company.” And now that the home still feels like the safest place to gather for the

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How an art icon wants to revitalize Nigeria’s creative ecosystem with a residency for artists

Yinka Shonibare is fascinated by the complexities and the global flows that make up African identities. This is evident in his widely recognized use of “African” wax print fabrics, a recurring motif in Shonibare’s artworks. These designs however are Indonesian batik fabrics produced by the Dutch, and are widely distributed across Western Africa.

“I liked the layers of identity of those fabrics,” Shonibare says. “The fabrics became a metaphor for the contemporary African”. Known for his visual explorations on post-colonialism, globalization and identity, Shonibare’s work examines the transnational mobility and fluidity of African identities and explores the multiplicity of cosmopolitanism.

Understanding the wider cultural significance of Shonibare’s works is imperative to understanding how he aims to redefine Nigeria’s cultural and creative landscape. His political views, themes and explorations are somewhat integrated into the mission and vision of his latest philanthropic initiative, Guest Artists Space (G.A.S) Foundation. Scheduled

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Where to buy face masks as they become mandatory in England

Wearing a covering is different to a medical mask that should be reserved for frontline workers: iStock
Wearing a covering is different to a medical mask that should be reserved for frontline workers: iStock

Ever since coronavirus began spreading across the world, there has been some debate on the use of face masks, including who should wear them and the benefits of them.

After months of not being compulsory in England, the government made face coverings mandatory on public transport and for hospital visits from 15 June. Uber also made masks compulsory for customers and staff from this date.

These rules will also extend to supermarkets, indoor shopping centres, banks, and post offices and shops from 24 July.

People who don’t wear one will face a fine of up to £100, apart from those with certain medical conditions, children under 11 and those who lip-read.

If you’re picking up a takeaway coffee or food in England, you’ll also have to wear a mask, but this rule

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Where to buy face coverings for children as rules in England change

The new government advice states that children under the age of two should not wear a face mask: iStock
The new government advice states that children under the age of two should not wear a face mask: iStock

Face masks are set to become a part of everyday life following the government announcement that face coverings are now mandatory on public transport and in hospitals.

It was recently announced that from 24 July, face coverings will be mandatory in all shops and supermarkets in England. People who don’t will face a fine of up to £100, apart from people with medical conditions and children under 11.

On 14 July health secretary, Matt Hancock, said: “We want to give people more confidence to shop safely and enhance protections for those who work in shops,” while noting the disproportionate impact that the pandemic has had on shop workers.

“The death rate of sales and retail assistants is 75 per cent higher amongst men and 60 per cent higher amongst women

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